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Tuesday, October 15, 2013

EUROPE BY FOLLOWING THE METALUCEAN POLITICS CAN BE A LEADER AGAIN


DEAR FELLOWS,CHAIRESTHAI,
EPAPHOS ADVISORS PRESENCE AND PARTICIPATION TO THE EVENT

"BLUE BIOTECHNOLOGY AT THE SERVICE OF REGIONAL GROWTH"

https://twitter.com/epaphosinfo/status/387609581859639296

WHICH WAS ORGANIZED BY THE REGIONAL COUNCIL OF BRITTANY AT BRUSSELS,
EXPRESSED OUR CONSULTANCY'S INTEREST FOR THE SECTOR.


DEFINITION

biotechnology

Part of the Nanotechnology glossary:
Biotechnology is the use of biological processes, organisms, or systems to manufacture products intended to improve the quality of human life. The earliest biotechnologists were farmers who developed improved species of plants and animals by cross pollenization or cross breeding. In recent years, biotechnology has expanded in sophistication, scope, and applicability.
The science of biotechnology can be broken down into subdisciplines called red, white, green, and blue. Red biotechnology involves medical processes such as getting organisms to produce new drugs, or using stem cells to regenerate damaged human tissues and perhaps re-grow entire organs. White (also called gray) biotechnology involves industrial processes such as the production of new chemicals or the development of new fuels for vehicles. Green biotechnology applies to agriculture and involves such processes as the development of pest-resistant grains or the accelerated evolution of disease-resistant animals. Blue biotechnology, rarely mentioned, encompasses processes in marine and aquatic environments, such as controlling the proliferation of noxious water-borne organisms.
Biotechnology, like other advanced technologies, has the potential for misuse. Concern about this has led to efforts by some groups to enact legislation restricting or banning certain processes or programs, such as human cloning and embryonic stem-cell research. There is also concern that if biotechnological processes are used by groups with nefarious intent, the end result could be biological warfare.


Policies
Biotechnology is the driving technology of the bio-economy. It contributes to innovation in all the other Activities under the bio-economy, namely food, agriculture and forestry, and fisheries and aquaculture.
Due to the very interdisciplinary nature of the bio-economy, each of the six areas under Activity 2.3 Biotechnologies is linked to a wide range of different European policies. Furthermore, they are also influenced by many international policies and strategy papers.
In the following, some of the main policies that are related to the different areas of biotechnology are listed.

CONTINUING TO THE POINT OF OUR INTEREST

Area 2.3.2 Marine and fresh-water biotechnology (blue biotechnology)

In this area, research priorities are strongly driven by Marine and Maritime policies on economical and environmental sustainability.
Our seas and oceans with their largely unexplored biodiversity provide a high potential for innovation in two different fronts: the better understanding of marine and maritime resources and its biodiversity, and the more efficient exploitation of their economic and scientific potential. Marine biotechnology is the enabling tool that will allow translating this potential into real products and acknowledge.
The Action Plan for the EU Integrated Maritime Policy and the related Green paper on Maritime Policy specifically call for a strong science base maritime policy and identify blue biotechnology as one of the key enabling technologies and maritime economic sectorsEuropean Strategy for Marine and Maritime Research  prioritises marine biodiversity and biotechnology research, and recognised its potential to contribute to new knowledge on which to base high value products and processes and increase marine resources and biodiversity understanding. More detailed information is provided on the DG Maritime Affairs website.
Advances in Marine biotechnology research will also contribute to more effectively protect the marine environment across Europe and this through the definition of Good Environmental Status (GES) indicators as requested by European Union's Marine Strategy Framework. A comprehensive summary of environmental policy can also be found on the DG Environment website.
More detailed information on research activities and related policies in marine and fresh water environments that link to Area 2.3.2 may also be found under the KBBE webpage on Fisheries and Aquaculture and the DG Research and Innovation website.

MORE AT  http://ec.europa.eu/research/bioeconomy/biotechnology/policy/index_en.htm


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