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Tuesday, June 28, 2011

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE NEW INTERNET IPv6

(CLICKING ON THE TITLE WE SHALL BE DIRECTED TO THE ARTICLE  " What Security Issues Does IPv6 Pose? "  )

DEAR FELLOWS,HELLO,

LAST WEEK OUR EPAPHOS TEAMWORK HAD THE HONOUR IN FOLLOWING TWO IMPORTANT  SUMMITS HERE AT BRUSSELS :
A) THE INFO DAY FP7 ENVIRONMENTAL CALL ,WHERE WERE PRESENTED SOME VERY INVENTIVE CHALLENGES.
B)THE TWO DAY DIGITAL AGENDA ASSEMBLY ,WHICH WAS VERY FRUITFUL WITH A LOTS OF WORKSHOPS AND NEW IDEAS TO BE DEPLOYED.
IT IS THOUGHT THAT WE SHOULD PRESENT  THE IMPORTANCE OF IPV6,SINCE ACCORDING TO SERIOUS  SCIENTIFIC ESTIMATIONS ,THE IP4 ADDRESSES ARE GOING TO END UP TO THE END OF THIS YEAR FOR EUROPE AND UP TO THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2012,ON A GLOBAL BASIS.THIS IS VERY CRUCIAL APART FOR THE PUBLIC SECTOR,FOR THE PRIVATE TOO.

THANK YOU
AGGELOS

What is IPv6?


The Internet is about to change in a major way. Though this change will be imperceptible to most users, businesses everywhere must begin equipping their networks now for a successful transition to IPv6.

Network communication, just like a face-to-face conversation, requires a common language for the successful transfer of information, says Wynand Moller, D-Link Country Manager.

The common language of the Internet is known as the Internet Protocol (IP). When a networked device such as a computer or smartphone connects to the Internet through an Internet service provider (ISP), a unique IP address is assigned to the device. This IP address allows the device to be uniquely identified and subsequently communicated over the Internet.

Internet Protocol version six, or IPv6, is an Internet layer protocol developed in the 1990s (and described in RFC2460) as an alternative to IPv4. Rather than using a 32-bit system, IPv6 is based on 128-bit addresses, meaning that there are 2128 individual addresses available, which is approximately 3.4×1038, and exactly:

340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456

IPv6 provides enough addresses to allow the Internet to continue to expand and the industry to innovate. It is not, however, directly compatible with IPv4, meaning that a device connected via IPv4 cannot communicate directly with a device connected using IPv6.
Deploying IPv6 on a global scale is vital to the Internet industry, but it requires pro-active steps on the part of industry players: technology must be upgraded, staff trained, business plans developed. Uptake to date has been relatively slow, but this is now changing, and businesses need to be aware of the need to adopt IPv6. To ignore IPv6 is to risk your medium to long term business viability.

IPv6 readiness: a primer for government agencies

Consider the possibilities that new applications present for the public sector. Mobile devices could help emergency personnel automatically triage and track the status of large numbers of disaster victims. Wireless sensors could help transportation agencies monitor the condition of bridges, highways and other critical infrastructure. And empowered by machine-to-machine technologies, physicians could remotely monitor the condition of elderly citizens, allowing them to safely remain in their own homes longer.
The Need for IPv6: IP addresses are the numeric identifiers that are assigned to every device connected to the Internet. When IPv4, the current Internet protocol technology, was introduced in 1981, no one imagined the vast number of addresses that would be consumed as various devices were created. The need for IP addresses will only continue to grow as we mobilize and connect devices.


SOURCE http://www.ipv6actnow.org/


What is Internet Protocol?
Internet Protocol is a set of technical  rules that defines how computers
communicate over a network. There are  currently two versions: IP version 4 (IPv4)
and IP version 6 (IPv6).

What is IPv4?
IPv4 was the first version of Internet  Protocol to be widely used, and accounts
for most of today’s Internet traffic. There are just over 4 billion IPv4 addresses.
While that is a lot of IP addresses, it is  not enough to last forever.

What is IPv6?
IPv6 is a newer numbering system that  provides a much larger address pool
than IPv4, amongst other features. It was deployed in 1999 and should meet
the world’s IP addressing needs well into the future.

What are the major differences?

The major difference between IPv4 and IPv6 is the number of IP addresses.
There are 4,294,967,296 IPv4 addresses. In contrast, there are
340,282,366,920,938,463,463,374,607,431,768,211,456 IPv6 addresses.

The technical functioning of the Internet remains the same with both versions
and it is likely that both versions will continue to operate simultaneously on
networks well into the future. To date,most networks that use IPv6 support
both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses in their networks.



SOURCE  ARIN  AMERICAN REGISTRY FOR INTERNET NUMBERS


Training4IPv6

IPv6 is a cornerstone of the Future Internet. Europe has been playing a key role up to now on the worldwide scene, but is more and more challenged by countries such as the USA, China, Korea and Japan. To ensure both business continuity of the European industry and to get benefits from IPv6 added technologies, the 2008 European Commission (EC) Communication, in its action plan, requests that by 2010, 25% of the users should be able to connect to IPv6.
Based on the deployment level as perceived today, this is a real ambitious target which requires training a number of resources are they public or private.
inno has been assigned by the European Commission to identify the main actors in all sectors and the processes related to the training and dissemination of the new protocol IPv6 and provide mechanisms, incentives and best practices that can help in deploying this new technology efficiently and timely.
The database of the "Training providers" section of this website gathers organisations providing IPv6 training. If you are involved in IPv6 training, please feel free to register your training organisation, otherwise, you can browse this platform.

SOURCE   http://www.training4ipv6.eu/

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2 Comments:

At 7:17 AM, Blogger James Kayden said...

I am very glad to read this nice article. I am happy that you made this concept very clear in front of people and to be very frank this is useful information too. Keep it up.
Wireless Internet Alberta

 
At 2:13 PM, Blogger The visioner said...

THANKS JAMES FOR YOUR GOOD WORDS,AND SORRY FOR MY DELAYED ANSWER,BUT JUST NOW YOUR COMMENT IT WAS READ.EYCHARISTOO FOR YOUR CONTRIBUTION :-)

 

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